Dom DeMarco DiFarra Pizza

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“Yes!!!” Eating Pizza Made by The Maestro DOM DeMARCO

Is a Religious Experience !!!

 

Much has been said of the now famed Pizzeria (DiFarra Pizza) on Avenue J in Brooklyn, New York the Capital of Thee Best Pizza in the whole United States of America, bar-none, even Manhattan. Brooklyn lays claim to the Top two Pizzerias in the country, the top of the list 1 and 2, number 1, The Best and number 2, the second best. Well no, I don’t know if I should put it that way, as it sound s as one is better than the other, which is not ht e case, as they are both equally good, equally Great and equally the Best Pizza and the Best Pizzerias in the United States, though they are are little different than one another. The Pizza at both Totonno’s on Neptune Avenue in Coney Island, Brooklyn, New York and Di Farra Pizza on Avenue J in Brooklyn are both otherworldly specimens of some the Finest Pizza on other and the Undisputed Best Pizza in America.

Wow, got off on a tangent about both Di Farra and Totonno’s when I just intended to talk about Di Farra Pizza, Dom DeMarco the Maestro of Di Farra’s and the Religious experience that it is to go there, watch Dominic masterfully make Pizza after glorious Pizza (without the help of anyone else), to watch in awe and anticipation and Salivation til you finally get yours (after about a hour or hour and a half wait), you hold it in your hand like a precious baby, and then to sink your teeth into it, savoring each wondrous bite after the other. “Yes,” it is truly a religious experience, that is, if you are a great lover of this wonderful invention, created in Napoli, spread throughout the the Italian Peninsular and then across the Atlantic to America from Italian Immigrants where Gennaro Lombardi opened the First Pizzeria in America on Prince Street in New York City some 100 years ago or so.

Back to Di Farra and Pizzaiolo Extraordinaire, Mr. Dominic DeMarco. It is Dominic that makes Di Farra what it is, it certainly isn’t the Pizzeria itself which is ultra plain and even appalling to some. Mr. DeMarco’s pizzas are just about as close to absolute perfection in the Pizza Making World, a world in which New York City excels and has only one rival in Naples, Italy and the whole of Italy itself. Mr. De Marco has the magic touch, with perfect dough, the perfect balance of ingredients, tomato and other ingredient ratio to cheese, and this include Mr. Demarcos judicious use of Olive Oil which is right-on and a little magic touch that whoever complains about it, just does not know there Pizza and Italian Food on a whole. We Italians love our olive oil. And those who complain are unaware that it is a condiment that adds the final last touch to many dishes before they are eaten. Dominic knows this and should not be discourage against his generous use of it by those who do not understand the proper essence of the Italian Table. So please, keep your traps shut, if you don’t like it don’t eat it, this countries finest examples of the Pizza Art.

And on to the religious experience of Di Farra, Dom DeMarco and the mans artistry with Pizza. There is nothing quite like it in the entire Pizza World. There does not exist, to my knowledge any place in the world that has an elderly man making a hundred plus Pizzas a day in a place that has endless lines, day and night. Pizza that are so perfect, words can not describe People line up for greatness and artistry, and for a couple of slices of the most marvelous pizza this side of Naples, and to watch this passionate little old man work his heart out, not getting, not allowing anyone else to make a pie at his beloved Pizzeria. The man is elderly. He’s worked his whole life. He makes such a magical thing that people line up each and every day to see him and eat one of his many masterpieces. With business like this, he could hire to other Pizzaiolos to help him, doubling or tripling his business and and financial intake. He could hire two guys and make pizza aloing with them, or sit back and get three guys to do it. At his age, he’s entitled to. But know, Dom DeMarco loves what he does, he loves his Pizza, each and every one that passes that counter and into thousands of appreciative hands. The man feels that no one else can make a Pizza the way he does; and wants; he grinds

chunks of Peceriono Romano in an old hand cranked meat grinder and sprinkles on each pie just before serving, along with cutting fresh Basil onto the Pizza at the last moment after Dom’s prerequisite drizzling of the Olive Oil giving two different taste and contrast on the same pie, one baked on (Cheese) and one applied at the last moment, devoid of the hot oven heat. Dom guilds the Lilly, so to speak. This is truth, not just a figure of speech.

Yes Dom makes each and every Pizza that goes out or is consume on the spot, at DiFarra’s. No one else has his skills, his passion and love for the Pizza, thus he does it all himself. And this my friends is the reason that going to Di Farra’s to watch Dominic the maestro in action, all by himself while hundreds of people line up every day, waiting an hour and a half to two hours just to get a Pizza (not just any old Pizza mind you). “It’s a Religious Experience.” Truly! A show and there is nothing like it in the World, Dom DeMarco, a man and his Pizza, America’s Best, and something to rival that other World Pizza Capital, Napoli.

 

by Daniel Bellino Zwicke

SUNDAY SAUCE "When Italian-Americans Cook" by Daniel Bellino-Zwicke, is Available on AMAOZN.com  .. CLICK LINK BELOW  .. http://www.amazon.com/Sunday-Sauce-When-Italian-Americans-Cook/dp/1490991026

SUNDAY SAUCE “When Italian-Americans Cook” by Daniel Bellino-Zwicke, is Available on AMAOZN.com .. CLICK LINK BELOW ..
http://www.amazon.com/Sunday-Sauce-When-Italian-Americans-Cook/dp/1490991026

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Me And My Gabagool

Me And My Gabagool

Me and my Gabagool, I just Love it! Gabagool that is. Otherwise known as Capicola,Capocollo,Capicolla, and Ham Capicole .. Gabagool (Capicola) is a Italian Salumi porl product made from the pork neck or shoulder .. Unlike Salami, which is made of ground meat mixed with ground pork fat that is seasoned, salted and cured, Capicola is a whole piece of meat similar to prosciutto in that it is cured in a whole piece. Italian-AMericans particularly love their Gabagool and Gabagool Sandwiches either as part of a Sub Sandwich with Provolone, Salami, lettuce,onions, tomatoe, Olive Oil and Vinegar .. Some get Capicola with Provolone and Hot Peppers or the same without the Hot Peppers. I love Capicola with just Provolone or Gabagool & Egg with two scrambled eggs with 3 slices of Sweet Gabagool. Some like their Gabagool Hot, I prefer it sweet. Not that it is sweet with sugar, just that it’s not hot .. You can make Gabagool & Egg Sandwiches like I saide with a couple scrambled eggs and a few slices of Capicolla on a small hero or Kaiser Roll or Italian Bread .. OR you can make Gabagool & Egg by chopping the Gabagool and cooking it in a little olive oil and then add the eggs and scramble the sauteed Capicola inside the scrambled eggs and you can have it with Swiis or Provolone CHeese or not .. Anyway you make the Gabagool, it’s always good and much loved. Bon Apettito di Gabgool.

Gabagool is Neapolitan dialect for Capicola, a Salumi pork product made from the neck of the pig.

Gabagool is Neapolitan dialect for Capicola, a Salumi pork product made from the neck of the pig.

 

 

THE FEAST of The 7 FISH ITALIAN CHRISTMAS EVE DINNER

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The FEAST of THE 7 FISH  is AVAILABLE on AMAZON.com

Christmas Eve Fish Dinner is, without question, the most important, the most festive, the most familial, the warmest and most memorable family gathering. For me, Christmas Eve Dinner surpasses every other holiday, As important and delightful as Thanksgiving of Easter or even Fourth of July might be, nothing approaches the ineffable depth and richness of Christmas Eve Fish Dinner offered a table unlike that of any other holiday.

But before I go further, let’s consider the name of this dinner. Among some Italians that I have questioned it is called “Feast of the Seven Fishes,” for other families, including my own, it was simply Christmas Eve Fish Dinner. There was no specific number of fish involved. Carol Field’ Celebrating Italy, a most thorough study of Italian holidays, notes that Christmas Eve dinner calls for fish but makes no mention of the number of fish dishes. Moving my investigation of the Christmas Eve dinner to Google Italy, I found that it is generally called “Il Cenone della Vigilia” (The great dinner of the Eve.) No Italian site I found made mention of the number of fish. I have the sense that the notion of seven fish may be Italian American and even here only among certain families.

The next question I considered was the type of fish. Almost every reference I found and all the people I interviewed had numerous variations. Among most Italians sites two fish appeared most often, baccalà and eel. Among traditional Italian Americans the two most common dishes were baccalà (usually in a cold salad recipe) and fried smelts. In many younger and less traditionally bound Italian Americans all the old time fish were gone. The new fish platters now included shrimp and fried fish and even fish sticks. Italian Americans are not alone in modernization. It seems that even in Italy the younger generations recoil at the notion of such fish as eel.

While what this dinner is rightly called and which fish are those to be presented seems to vary from region to region and family to family a few things about Christmas Eve fish dinner, go unquestioned. Christmas Eve fish dinner was the one dinner no one missed. Christmas Eve fish dinner was at the home of the patriarch or matriarch. Every child and grandchild was present. The power of the Italian American Christmas Eve dinner overwhelmed all other cultural influences. While the fish dinner may have been rooted in Italy it spread its branches to include and embrace not only those non-Italians who had married into the family but all those of other ethnic backgrounds who were friends beyond the family. Everyone with any association to the family was invited to the Christmas Eve fish dinner.

While all other holiday dinners gathered the family while there was still light in the sky, Christmas Eve Fish Dinner began sometime after sunset. It was and is, the only festive dinner in the Italian American tradition that is shared in darkness. All other holidays in the Italian American tradition are celebrated at the table sometime shortly after noon. Christmas Eve Fish Dinner always began sometime after six in the evening.

Christmas Eve Fish Dinner differs from all other dinners by its lack of structure. Other dinners, whether Sunday Gravy or Easter Sunday follow a certain formality. For other dinners there is always a soup course, an antipasto, the pasta, the main course and then the dessert. The Christmas Eve Fish Dinner was quite different. The Christmas Eve Fish Dinner had courses, but the courses were not single dishes. For the Christmas Eve fish dinner each course was composed of several offerings. And the whole dinner was preceded by a cold table of finger foods that allowed mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces and nephews to chatter for an hour or so before dinner began. The finger foods were set on small tables in the living room. The platters included olives, slices of celery and broccoli, and a dish of crackers. There were also plates of cooked shrimp with sides of shrimp cocktail sauce. The olives were from cans and the children liked to slide the pit wholes over their fingers as they chomped on the olives. I would guess that the shrimp and the horseradish based cocktail sauce was an influence from the fashionable restaurants of the time.

After at least an hour of nibbling on the side platters the dinner bell called us to the tables. Yes, tables. In our family there were three. In our center hall style house, the dining room table was turned towards the center hall. A second and third table were butted up to the main table. The three tables continued through the center hall into the living room. Seating was determined by age. The oldest sat in the dining room section; the younger the child the closer to the living room.

There was no soup on Christmas Eve. When we sat at the table we first saw a small bowl of whiting salad with lemon and a serving of “scungilli,” conch. When I was small there was a cold baccalà salad with tomato. These cold fish salads were followed by the pasta. Of course, we never heard or used the word “pasta.” For us the “pasta” dish was one of three possibilities. It changed from year to year. It could be either “Clams and Spaghetti,” “Mussels and Spaghetti,” or “Squid and Spaghetti.” The spaghetti were always the very thin “angel hair” (“capellini.”)

The next course is always a serving of several varieties of fried fish. My Irish background mother prepared several fish offerings in different ways. There are three central dishes. First, she made a tray of plain American fish sticks for the children and for those at the table of a less than Italian heritage. Then, as a middle ground, my mother makes the most exquisite crab cakes that would appeal to Italian traditionalists as much as to the non- Italian in-laws. For the old timers there is always the most wonderful finger food, fried smelts with lemon. There are also fried scallops, fried shrimp, fried calamari and fried oysters.

Following the fried dishes, the table is covered with several trays of broiled scallop, shrimp and clams. Then comes the main fish platter. This platter has no Italian precedent that I know of. My mother introduced this dish about thirty years ago: stuffed orange roughy papillote. The orange roughy papillote is made by splitting the fish into two pieces and filling with a layer of spinach with tomato, garlic and olive oil. The fish is wrapped in parchment and baked.

After a rest and an interlude of conversation the Christmas Eve Fish dinner is crowned by the dish everyone waits for, my mother’s tray of Christmas cookies. We began at five in the evening. After the cookies it is after 11. The culmination of the Christmas Eve Fish Dinner is Midnight Mass. Following Christmas Midnight Mass the family came home to a wonderful breakfast of eggs and bacon and, in Philadelphia, of scrapple. The special delight of the breakfast was the Christmas Bread, a wonderful brioche-like pastry shaped in a ring and decorated with multi-colored sprinkles. But Christmas bread is another page.

 

by TONY D MORINELLI

3 NEW YORK TIMES STARS For CARBONE

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Pete Wells, The New York Times food critic gives Carbone 3 Stars, but his Review barely rates a Fair. It was an awful Blase Review of New York’s Hottest new Restaurant, Carbone. Don’t get your signals crossed, Wells didn’t right badly about Carbone, it’s just that his writing style of this article wasn’t very good, it was again, in fact Blase and harkens back to the awful New York Times Reviews of Frank Bruni .. The article had no sustenance, no pizzazz. Wells told as that the Vongole could have been more flavorful, The Tira Mi Su wasn’t that good, that the Veal Parm was the way you always hoped it would be. He liked the Rigatoni and Tortellini, as well as Lobster Fra Diavolo and Scampi.

We’ve been waiting a few months for The New York Times to review Carbone and we gotta say, the reveiw is a disappointment. Grub Street, The New York Observer, New York Magazine, and even The New York Post put out better reviews to The Times Blase one.

Pete Wells generally writes a good review, but this one, as The Big Boys in Brooklyn would say, Fuhgettabout-it !!! You get a “Satisfactory” on this one Pete. In the end, not many will remember how poorly this review was written, but the fact that Carbone got a 3 Star New York Times review.  And I’m sure Mario Carbone and Rich Torissi could care less that the piece wasn’t written very well, but that they got 3 Stars. For now on, that’s all they are anyone will say, Three Stars from The New York Times. Basta!

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La TAVOLA Is ITALIAN In GREENWICH VILLAGE

JOE’S DAIRY And NEW YORK’S BEST MOZZARELLA COMING To An END

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Yes folks,sad but true, Joe’s Dairy is closing. After 60 years in business, the beloved little Cheese Shop, a.k.a. “Jimmy The Cheeseman’s Store” from The Pope of Greenwich Village, will sell their last ball of fresh Home Made Mozzarella (The best in The City) at 6 PM today May, 11 2013, and New York and the Italian Community of South Greenwich Village loses but one more beloved institution.

This is particularly a major blow to we Italian-Americans who lost our much loved Rocco Restorante on Thompson Street in The Village last year. Rocco’s, after 90 years in Greenwich Village lost it’s lease last year and The Torissi Boys quickly swooped in to open “Carbone,” which promised to be a classic Old School Downtown New York Italian Red Sauce Joint like Rocco’s was, but with $50 Veal Parmigiano and $52 Veal Marsala on the menu, it just doesn’t seem so.

And so my friends we lose another beloved old New York Mom-and-Pop business to greed landlords.  It’s a Sin, and we all wish something could be done about this scourge. Bye-Bye Joe’s we’ll surely miss you there on Sullivan Street, and we’re gonna miss New York’s Best Mozz. So we’re do we go now? I still refuse to set food in that awful, overprice commercial enterprise Eataly, that’s for tourist and another type of person I will not mention. Guess I’ll have to walk down to DiPalo’s. Joe’s was only 2 blocks from my house. I’ll miss it so.

 

 

 

 

 

Daniel Bellino-Zwicke

 

 

 

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SUNDAY GRAVY THE WORLDS MOST EXPENSIVE SAUCE

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SUNDAY GRAVY

$35.00 A JAR

The  WORLD’S MOST EXPENSIVE

ITALIAN JARED PASTA SAUCE

 

Mamma mia! That’s a lot of money to mangia.

At $35 a jar, Sunday Gravy is the most expensive pasta sauce in town — and the price tag is giving some people agita. “You’re kidding me, right?!” belched one Facebook poster. “Who in their right mind would pay $35 for sauce?”

The ruby-red delicacy costs far more than celebrity blends made by Mario Batali ($7.80), Lidia Bastianich ($6.80) or Rao’s ($8).

And it’s more than double the $16 for a plate of pasta with meat sauce at Eataly’s La Pasta or even a $22 penne with veal and pork ragu at Il Buco.

 IF YOU THINK THIS IS An ABSURD PRICE and WANT TO MAKE YOUR OWN TASTY ITALIAN SUNDAY SAUCE GRAVY alla CLEMENZA alla FRANK SINATRA

GET YOURSELF A COPY of DANIEL BELLINO-ZWICKE’S AWESOME BOOK

“La TAVOLA” ITALIAN-AMERICAN NEW YORKERS ADVENTURES of THE TABLE

With MANY GREAT RECIPES INCLUDING SUNDAY SAUCE alla CLEMENZA, THE WAY FRANK SINATRA LIKED IT … MANGIA!!!

 IF YOU MAKE THE SUNDAY SAUCE GRAVY RECIPE in “La TAVOLA” IT WILL COST YOU ABOUT $35 to $40 to MAKE a LARGE BATCH THAT WILL FEED ABOUT 20 PEOPLE or MAKE 20 SERVINGS of SAUCE WITH PASTA and SOME MEATBALL PARM SANDWICHES … YOU’D HAVE to BUY 5 JARS of SUNDAY GRAVY The WORLD’S MOST EXPENSIVE JARRED PASTA SAUCE, COSTING YOU ABOUT $175 .. If you MAKE YOUR OWN SAUCE YOU WILL SAVE ABOUT $130.00, YOUR SAUCE WILL BE BETTER, IT’S MORE FUN and YOU CAN GET A GREAT NEW ITALIAN FOOD BOOK (La Tavola) To BOOT .. BASTA!

The ULTIMATE  SUNDAY SAUCE  GRAVY RECIPE CLICK LINK To PURCHAE A COPY of "La TAVOLA"

The ULTIMATE
SUNDAY SAUCE
GRAVY RECIPE
CLICK Picture of BOOK To PURCHASE A COPY of “La TAVOLA”