Danny Talks Tony s Italian Bar

MareChiareBLACKnWHITE.jpg

Mare Chiare

“TONY’S NUT HOUSE

Mulberry Street

Tucked between a partly vacant Roman Catholic church and a Vietnamese herbal store, the Beard Cafe, on Elizabeth Street, near Broome, could be mistaken for another downtown bar, priced out of SoHo or the East Village. At night, young urbanites and European tourists mingle to enjoy techno music and imported beer. Leftist literature competes for attention with a video art installation.

But during the day, the place mellows to resemble a European coffee shop with fresh muffins and stale cigarettes. When four elderly Italian men arrive, they create a bit of old Little Italy: the private social club, in the midst of a now-fashionable neighborhood. The men go to the rear of the club and descend into a hideout in the basement, where they spend several hours.

”It is the last traditional social club,” said Lillian Tozzi, a founder of the Little Italy Neighbors Association, whose family has lived on Mulberry Street for over a century.

The members of the club declined to be interviewed, but visitors say the basement is sparsely furnished with little more than a television set, a refrigerator and fading photographs of neighborhood friends. Not much happens, they add, besides watching television, playing a friendly game of hearts and chatting. Fans of ”The Sopranos” would be disappointed.

”You go to hang out with the boys,” said Tony Tenneriello, 80, the bartender at Mare Chiaro, an oak-paneled bar on Mulberry Street that evokes the area’s bygone charm. ”The bars were different back then. You could play a game of cards for a bottle of wine.” 

2002

MareCHAREtontTONY.jpg

TONY

Tony Tenneriello & Family

At His ITALIAN BAR

MARE CHIARE

aka “TONY’S NUT HOUSE”

 

SinatraTONYStony.jpg

SINATRA with TONY

At TONY’S

.

.

dc100-Screen2BShot2B2016-10-302Bat2B2.25.182BPM

TONY’S FAVORITE

ITALIAN-AMERICAN FOOD

RECIPES

BUYnoww

.

.

I first started going to Tony’s somewhere around 1984. Being myself (Danny) I always love the offbeat kind of place, whether we’re talking about restaurants, stores, Barber Shops, or in this cas bars.  Don’t want anything shiney and knew, and most likely quite contrived. Give me a cool old well worn place like McSorley’s Ale House on East 7th Street (Since 1854) John’s of 12th Street, a few blocks from McSorley’s, Pete’s Tavern (Gramercy Park), or the good old Italian Bar, Mare Chiare on Mulberry Street in New York’s so-called Little Italy. Well, Mare Chiare (aka Tony’s Nut House) no longer exist. Not as that cool old Italian Bar, run by the unflappable Tony Tennerielo himself. Tony was just “Too Cool.” And he wasn’t even trying to be, he was just being Tony.

His Bar was absolutely awesome. It was low key, and had a cool old ambiance. It’s original 1908 deccor was kept pretty much intact. Tony’s was usually pretty quiet and you could go in there and get a drink, sit down at the bar or a table, throw a few quarters in the Juke Box, and play some “Dino,” Tony Bennett, and of course songs by Mr. Frank Sinatra. Sit down and relax, listening to great Italian-American music as you sipped your drink and chit-chatted with your friends. I here the place used to be busier back in the day, when the Old Police Head Quarters was still open, prior to 1973 when it was shut down and moved to it new facilities near City Hall. Before that, Mare Chiaro had a bit of a livelier crowd filled with lots of Policemen and Detectives of NYPD before the closing of Police HQs on Broome and Layfayette Streets nearby. The time-span when I went from 1984 until Tony Tenneriello sold his family’s old Italian Bar in 2003. Yes, most  of the times I went to Tony’s wan’t crowded, usually, less than 12 people in the place. Regulars like me, simply called it Tony’s.

Besides going there any old time, especially on Sunday afternoons to watch a Giant’s or Yankees game, my favorite thing to do was to get an awesome Italian Sub Sandwich (to Go) at Parsisi’s Sanwich Shop, bring it to Tony’s, get a glass of Wine, put on some Sinatra and eat our tasty Sandwiches .

Yes, I had a lot of great times at Tony’s, but the best of all, was being at Tony’s one time when it was Tony’s Birthday. His family brought a Birthday Cake, we all sang “Happy Birthday Dear Tony,” Tony blew out the candles and we all had a piecce of cake, as one of his friends sang a couple Opera Songs. “Now what’s better than that I ask you?” Getting to sing Happy Birthdday to Mr. Anthony Tenneriello and sharing the good times and Tony’s Birthday Cake with the man himself.

Daniel Bellino Zwicke

I have a few old pictures I took at Tony’s back in the day. One day I’ll dig them up and post them here, for you can never get enough of Tony, or his awesome old bar, Mare Chiaro, aka Tony’s Nut House.

Basta !

 

The NEW YORK OBSERVER … March 4, 2003

 

TONY SELLS MARE CHIARO

“Arrivederci , Tony”

Already, the regulars are suspicious.

 

Mare Chiaro’s was a Little Italy watering hole with oak-paneled walls, sawdust on the floor and the Old World atmosphere of an Italian social club. In the 1990’s, both the Paris Review crowd and the dot-com Wunderkinds embraced the bar as their own, despite the bright overhead lights and lack of fruit-flavored martinis. More recently, Nolita hipsters have held court-all under the watchful eye of Tony Tenneriello, who sold the bar last month. Until then, Mr. Tenneriello, 81, could be seen there every night, cigar in his mouth, working past 1 a.m., shuffling from table to table to clear glasses and staring defiantly at anyone who lingered too long or got too rowdy. Locals just called the place “Tony’s.”

Mr. Tenneriello said he sold the bar because of his age and the long hours the job required. “It looked like I was going to die in that bar,” he said. “But I sold it.”

The new owners haven’t decided yet whether to take down the black-and-white photographs of Tony posing with Frank Sinatra, Ronald Reagan, Madonna and others. “We have to retain the spirit of the bar,” said co-owner Eddy Welsh, 67, “but we also have to attract a new crowd. How much of a change do you make? Where do you draw the line?”

Indeed, Mr. Welsh and co-owner Richard Cestaro, 40, both local businessmen whose families grew up on Mulberry Street, have the unenviable task of “running Tony’s without Tony.” Their influence is already evident. In order to restore the exterior to what it looked like when the bar first opened in 1908, they’ve added copper outlay to the bar’s wooden doors and repainted the window frames, restoring them to their original white. Inside the bar, top-shelf liquor has been added, as has tap beer. The $3 Coronas now cost $5, and on the jukebox a buck buys two songs instead of three. The sawdust is gone. Soon the bar will serve lunch and late-night snacks: chicken wings, peel-your-own shrimp, eggs and peppers. Also under consideration is live Dixieland or country music. “Please God, NO !!!”

The bar had been in Mr. Tenneriello’s family since the turn of the century, when his father, Christopher Tenneriello, opened a small bar called C. Tenneriello’s at 1761¼2 Mulberry. Tony’s father worked the bar and Tony’s mother cooked Chicken Parmigiana and Spaghetti & Meatballs for a crowd of local Italians. After school, Tony would go to the bar and do his homework.

The police were the bar’s biggest crowd, coming in for lunch from their nearby headquarters on Centre Street. Members of the neighborhood’s crime families stayed away, according to Mr. Tenneriello.

“I’m not saying that no one ever came in,” he said. “But let me just say, thank God for the police.”

The police headquarters moved away in 1973, as did many of the neighborhood Italians, replaced by Chinese immigrants. By the late 80’s, the bulk of Mare Chiaro’s business were tourists who came to the city to visit the rash of new restaurants on Mulberry Street. Padding out the crowd was a mix of Artists and Writers . In the mid-1990’s, editors from the Paris Review met there every Friday night. The dot-commers would come by after long hours at their Broadway offices.

Nowadays, the crowd is thinner. A recent Thursday night found the bar sparsely populated with a mix of tourists, hipsters (White Stripes look-alikes) and stockbrokers. Sinatra’s “Summer Wind” played on the jukebox; an eager, short-haired female bartender was offering shots.

One of the stockbrokers, Mike, in his mid-30’s, had been coming to Mare Chiaro for the last six years.

“It was better when Tony ran the place,” he said, lowering his voice and looking around the bar. “The new owners want to get the yuppies in here. You can tell by the little things they’re doing-raising the prices of the drinks, the jukebox.”

Asked about this, Mr. Cestaro looked pained and said, “You can’t run a business selling $3 drinks.” He added that the bar’s prices are now on par with the other neighborhood bars.

If Mr. Cestaro and Mr. Welsh don’t have the full support of some of the regulars, they seem to have earned the respect of locally owned Italian businesses.

“To be honest, the bar needed an update,” shrugged one Mulberry Street restaurant owner. “The new owners are good guys. They realize they’re dealing with an institution; they’re not going to change it too much. Tony knew what he was doing when he sold it to them.”

Mr. Tenneriello said he has no interest in what the new owners may or may not change.

“What people want, and what people don’t want, it doesn’t matter,” he said, laughing hoarsely. “Things are going to change. It’s called progress, honey.”

READ about TONY in Italian-American New York Writer Daniel Bellino-Zwicke ‘s book       La TAVOLA – ITALIAN-AMERICAN NEW YORKERS ADVENTURES of The TABLE La Tavola

AVAILABLE on AMAZON.com

.

 

Screen Shot 2018-01-23 at 1.38.16 PM

READ About TONY

An His MULBERRY STREET

ITALIAN BAR

MARE CHIARO

aka “TONY’S NUT HOUSE”

In La TAVOLA

.

.

MareCHIARoTRIPadvisorREVIEW.jpg

BOLOGNESEcookbook

The RAGU BOLOGNESE COOKBOOK

And The WORLDS BEST BOLOGNESE RECIPE Ever !!

BUYnoww

 

 

.

 

.

Sinatra Bellino Luciano n Cappuccino

 

Screen Shot 2017-02-15 at 12.50.32 PM.png

Best Selling Italian Cookbook Author

Daniel Bellino-Zwicke and Frank Sinatra

Family’s are from LERCARA FRIDDI, SICILY

 

.

f779c-screen2bshot2b2015-11-112bat2b5-57-162bpm

FRANCIS ALBERT SINATRA

ROOTS Are From LERCARA FRIDDI, SICILIA, ITALIA

.

Best Selling Cookbook author Daniel Bellino-Zwicke has some things in common with the late-great Francis Albert Sinatra and famed Mafia Kingpin Charles “Lucky” Lucciano … What? Their families all hail from the town Lercara Friddi, Sicily in the Provence of Palermo in Italy … Lucciano was born there in 1897 and immigrated with his parents in 1907 to New York and the United States. Sinatra’s father Martino Sinatra was born in there in 1892 and his parents immigrated to New York in 1903 … Bellino’s maternal grandparents Josephina and Philipo Bellino were born in Lercara Friddi and immigrated to the United States to New York City in 1904, and later settled in the Italian Conclave of Lodi, New Jersey where Daniel’s grandfather set up a Shoemaker shop on Main Street … Take note that Sinatra’s grandfather was also a shoemaker in Lercara Friddi, and it is certain the these two grandfathers must have known each other in the small Sicilian town.

 

More on LERCARA FRIDDI

Lercara Friddi is a commune (municipality) in the Province of Palermo in the Italian region Sicily , located about 45 kilometers (28 mi) southeast of Palermo .

Founded in 1595 by local feudataries, it is on the slopes of Madore Hill, between the valleys of Fiumetorto and Platani rivers. In the past it was an important mining center, the only one in the province of Palermo where sulfur was excavated.

On December 25, 1893, eleven people were killed in the massacre Lercara Friddi During The Fasci Siciliani

uprising after a rally of peasants and sulfur miners That asked for the abolition of taxes and better working conditions.

Andrea Finocchiaro Aprile (1878-1964), politician

Mauro Picone (1885-1977), mathematician

Anthony Martin Sinatra (1892-1969), professional boxer and father of singer, Frank Sinatra (1915-1998)

Lucky Luciano (1897-1962), gangster

Pietro Scaglione (1906-1971), magistrate

Nicolo Nicolosi (1912-1986), football player and manager

Pietro Lo Forte (1920-2004), musician

Frédéric François (b. 1950), singer-songwriter

Daniel Bellino-Zwicke (b. 1958), cookbook author

 

e53f8-grandma-b-art-orig-7-15

GRANDMA BELLINO’S ITALIAN COOKBOOK

RECIPES From My SICILIAN GRANDMOTHER

by Daniel Bellino-Zwicke

Based on Sicilian Recipes from Daniel’s Maternal Nonna Giuseppina Bellino .. 

The Recipes are mostly Sicilian as well as Neapolitan dishes from Giuseppina’s friends who hailed from Napoli, Salerno, and the surrounding cities and towns of Naples.

RECIPES : ARANCINI (Sicilian Rice Balls), CAPONATA, STUFFED ARTICHOKES, BRACIOLA, ZUPPA LENTICHE (Lentil Soup) SPAGHETTI & MEATBALLS, PASTA LENTICHE, and More ….

 

Screen Shot 2017-02-15 at 1.19.55 PM.png

CHARLES “LUCKY” LUCIANO

Charles “Lucky” Luciano, born Salvatore Lucania November 24, 1897 – January 26, 1962) was an Italian-American mobster and Crime Boss. Luciano is considered the father of modern organized crime in the United States for the establishment of the first Commission. He was the first official boss of the modern Genovese crime family. He was, along with his associates instrumental in the development of the National Crime Syndicate in the United States.

Luciano was tried and successfully convicted for compulsory prostitution in 1936 after years of investigation by District Attorney Thomas E. Dewey. Luciano was given a thirty-year prison sentence, but was allowed to live his life freely outside the United States when he struck a deal with the government during World War II while still imprisoned.

 

 

Screen Shot 2016-08-04 at 8.00.44 PM.png

Sunday Sauce

When Italian-Americans Cook

by Daniel Bellino-Zwicke

Recipes :

SINATRA SUNDAY SAUCE

PASTA FAZOOL

SPAGHETTI MARINARA

and More …

 

zzzSophiaPIZZA

SOPHIA LOREN

.

 

Frank Sinatra Scrambled Eggs

Screen Shot 2015-12-31 at 1.27.41 PM

Frank Eating a Scrambled Egg Sandwich at home … Palm Springs California

 

Besides eating his Italian-American favorite foods, Frank loved eating a nice simple Scrambled Egg Sandwich on good old American white bread for breakfast and anytime during the day as a in-between meals snack prepared by his Valet George Jacobs ..

 

SCRAMBLED EGG SANDWICH alla SINATRA

Ingredients : 2 slices White Bread, 2 large Eggs, 2 tablespoons Milk, Butter, Salt & Black Pepper, 4 tablespoons Olive Oil

Place 2 tablespoons Olive Oil in a large non-stick frying pan and turn heat to medium low .. Add bread and cook until slightly brown. Turn bread over and cook to slightly brown. Remove from pan and set aside on the plate you will serve the sandwich.

Add eggs to a small bowl with a pinch each of Salt & Pepper and the Milk. Beat eggs with a fork until completely mixed …

Add remaining Olive Oil and Butter to pan and turn heat to medium.When the pan is heated and the butter starts to sizzle, add the eggs to pan and let cook while stirring for about 15 seconds. Turn heat to low and let the eggs cook without stirring for 45 seconds.

Flip the eggs over and let cook for 60 seconds on low heat. Turn heat off.

Place the cooked eggs on one piece of bread. Sprinkle a little salt & pepper over eggs. Top with second slice of bread and serve.

 

 

Screen Shot 2015-12-31 at 2.00.00 PM

VEAL MILANESE  “FRANK’S FAVORITE”

Screen Shot 2015-10-03 at 10.47.01 PM

SUNDAY SAUCE

LEARN HOW to Make SINATRA’S Favorite VEAL MILANESE,

Dolly Sinatra’s Meatballs and Marinara and more .. In SUNDAY SAUCE       by Daniel Bellino

e73e3-screen2bshot2b2015-10-122bat2b12-51-382bpm

BAKED ZITI with MEATBALLS

Like SINATRA, a SICILIAN FAVORITE

5148d-screenshot2013-09-16at1-01-57pm

FRANK & AVA GARDNER

“MANGIA BENE”

aa74b-screen2bshot2b2015-03-102bat2b11-26-192bpm

Grandma Bellino’s Cookbook

SICILIAN Like FRANK

af04b-sundaysauce

DOLLY SINATRA ‘S SUNDAY SAUCE

Recipe in SUNDAY SAUCE by Daniel Bellino

3d895-screenshot2014-04-13at1-10-39pm

                               Gangster  CHARLES “LUCKY” LUCCIANO                                                                     was from LERCARA FRIDDI , SICILY

as Was FRANK SINATRA’S Father Marty

and Author Daniel Bellino

Screen Shot 2015-10-24 at 8.32.05 PM

 

SOPHIA LOREN

“What a Beauty?”

a5ba6-screenshot2013-12-08at12-48-08pm

Classic Frank

 

0af59-screen2bshot2b2015-04-112bat2b1-22-152bpm

AL PACINO

Speaking of Great ITALIAN-AMERICANS

A Handsome Devil to Boot

Screen Shot 2015-10-24 at 9.45.16 PM

7ab6c-screenshot2014-03-04at1-11-56pm

eb490-patsyssssssssssssssss

PATSY’S

56th Street  .. New York, NY

FRANK’S FAVORITE RESTAURANT

.

.

 

 

 

Eat Like Frank Sinatra

Screen Shot 2018-02-17 at 3.10.25 PM

Frank Sinatra & Ava Gardner  …. “Mangia Bene”

Wanna Eat like the late great Frank Sinatra? Who wouldn’t? Frank was Sicilian-American and ate Sicilian food, but even more so he loved classic Italian-American Neapolitan Cusisine, with dishes like Clams Posillipo, Spaghetti Marinara, Eggplant Parmigiano, and Veal Milanese were Frank’s favorite dishes, and his favorite restauarnt to eat these dishes at was the great Old-School Italian Red-Sauce Joint on West 56th Street in New York called Patsy’s .. Yes it was Frank’s favorite, and when in New York Frank also liked to go to The 21 Club, PJ Clarke’s, Gilly’s, and Gino’s on Lexington Avenue …

.

thumb_DSC01835_1024

Patsy’s  … 56th Street

FRANK SINATRA’S Favorite Restaurant

.

Screen Shot 2015-11-11 at 6.34.01 PM

One of FRANK’S Favorites

CLAMS POSILLPO

.

Screen Shot 2015-11-11 at 6.37.55 PM

FRANK Loved VEAL MILANESE

Pounded Extra Thin

.

Screen Shot 2015-11-11 at 6.42.06 PM

Two of Frank’s Favorites

Together on One Plate

EGGPLANT PARMIGIANO & Spaghetti Marinara

.

71b2c-dsc01044

GNOCCHI POMODORO

.

3d895-screenshot2014-04-13at1-10-39pm

Charle’s “Lucky” Lucciano

Was From Lercara Friddi Sicily

The Same Town as Sinatra’s Father Anthony Martino

.

Screen Shot 2015-11-11 at 6.38.16 PM

FRANK Pours DEAN

a Shot of JACK DANIELS

Another of FRANK’S Favorites !!!

Sammy Davis Jr. Looks On

.

Screen Shot 2015-11-11 at 6.35.03 PM

Another of Frank’s Favorites

PJ Clarke’s  .. 3rd Avenue .. NEW YORK, NY

Where Frank Downed Many a JACK DANIELS

Screen Shot 2015-11-11 at 6.16.12 PM

FRANK Eating a Scrambled Egg & Bacon Sandwich

Yes Another Favorite

LEARN HOW TO MAKES SINATRA SAUCE

In Daniel Bellino’s SUNDAY SAUCE

a8145-mrnewyorkny2b252822529

Recipe in SUNDAY SAUCE

When Italian-Americans Cook

.

.

Screen Shot 2015-10-24 at 9.45.16 PM

COOKING ITALIAN

GREATEST HITS COOKBOOK

by Daniel Bellino Z

.

.

.

Italian American Food History

7ab6c-screenshot2014-03-04at1-11-56pm

Frank Sinatra in Mosaic

ITALIAN-AMERICAN FOOD  … A Brief History

Italian food is one of the most popular ethnic foods in America. In fact, it’s so popular that Italian food authorities have become concerned with what they call “Italian sounding” or “fake Italian food products.” According to one study, authentic Italian food — that’s food imported from Italy — accounts for only about one-third of Italian food purchased in the United States. The remainder is foods that have Italian names, but are not authentic Italian products.

Authentic Italian food products are available at specialty food stores in the United States –most notably in Italian food markets in cities with large populations of Italian Americans. Italian food producers say that Italy’s high standards, the importance of freshness and the cost and time of exporting have limited authentic Italian food products in the American market. However, the Internet has narrowed the gap, as more Italian products become available online.

Many say the trend toward Italian food started in the late nineteenth century as Italian immigrants began to make their homes in America. The waves of immigrants from Italy continued passing through Ellis Island, traveling further west, yet holding on to their cultural identity through their cooking.

One of the earliest dishes attributed to an Italian, and still extremely popular today, is Chicken Tetrazzini. It was created in the early 1900s in honor of Luisa Tetrazzini, the operatic soprano known as The Florentine Nightingale. The famous muffuletta sandwich of New Orleans, named after the muffuliette rolls baked in Sicily, was created in 1906 for Sicilian workers. The ever popular Philly cheese steak was invented by an Italian, and the specialty fish stew of San Francisco, cioppino, originated from the Italian fish stew ciuppin, made by the Genoese fishermen who settled there.

Soldiers returning from Italy after World War II brought with them their desire for the foods of a grateful but war-torn nation. Enterprising immigrants opened restaurants providing the soldiers with the foods they had developed a craving for and introduced the soldiers’ families to spaghetti and meatballs, sausage and peppers, ravioli, lasagna, manicotti, baked ziti and pizza.

Throughout the 50s and 60s, Italian food was becoming a part of the American diet and delicatessens offered salami, capocollo, mortadella, pepperoni, mozzarella and provolone, while spumone was a popular dessert, and variations of minestrone abounded. During the 70s and 80s, many Italian-inspired regional dishes became popular in America — Eggplant Parmigiana, Fettuccini Alfredo, Penne alla Vodka, Shrimp Scampi, Chicken Piccata, Chicken Cacciatore, Steak Pizzaiola, Osso Buco, Veal Marsala, Pasta Primavera, Fried Calamari, Saltimbocca, Caponata, Calzone and Stromboli. Grissini, semolina bread, risotto, broccoli rabe, arugula, radicchio, Gorgonzola, Parmigiano Reggiano, ricotta, olive oil, pesto, prosciutto, sun-dried tomatoes, pizzelle, cannoli, zeppole, torrone, gianduja, panettone and espresso were common additions to meals.

The 90s heralded a mass influx of Italian ingredients and foods, with bocconcini, mozzarella di bufala, ricotta salata, fontina, Asiago, Taleggio, Grana Padano, Pecorino Romano, caciocavallo, mascarpone, ciabatta, crostini, bruschetta, focaccia, panzanella, polenta, gnocchi, pancetta, specialty pestos, black and white truffles, balsamic vinegar, extra virgin olive oil, dipping oils, pasta — of all shapes, sizes, and colors, numerous pasta sauces, various types of pizza, cappuccino, flavored syrups, biscotti, tiramisù, granita and gelato.

So far, the twenty-first century has brought more attention to frittata, timballo, panini, Insalata Caprese, Burrata, Arancini, homemade specialty pastas, flavored balsamic vinegars and oils, artisan breads and cheeses and, although not a food, but food related — the barista. 

.

.

a8145-mrnewyorkny2b252822529

SUNDAY SAUCE

aka GRAVY

GREAT MOMENTS in ITALIAN FOOD HISTORY

1492 … Christopher Columbus discovers the Americas .. Soon thereafter, foods like Potatoes  (Gnocchi), Tomatoes  (Sugo di Pomodoro), and Corn (Polenta) are exported from the New World to Italy.

1880s  … The first 5 Million Italian Immigrants arrive in America and eventuall invent one of the the World’s Best Loved Cusines “Italian-American”

1889  …  Raffael Esposito invents Pizza Margherita in Naples, Italy honor of Queen Margherita ..

1891  …  Florentine baker Artusi Pelligrino writes the first modern Italian Cookbook .

1905   … America’s 1st ever Pizzeria, Lombardi’s is opened by Genaro Lombardi on Spring Street in New York .. Lombardi’s Pizzeria is till there, and is the 1st and oldest Pizzeria in the United States ..

1906  … Barbetta Restorante opens in the Theater District in New York .. It’s still open and run by the founders daughter Laura Maioglio ..

1908  … John’s of 12th Street opens on East 12th Street in the East Village .. Charles Lucky Luciano would whack (Murder) someone outside the restaurant one day.

1917  …  Alfredo di Lelio invents Fettuccine Alfredo at his restorante in Rome  .. Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks eat it on their honeymoon in 1926 and love it, and spread the word back in Hollywood, and the word spreads. Within a year, a recipe for Fettuccine Alfredo is in cookbooks in the States . Fettuccine Alfredo becomes one of America’s favorite dishes and is a bug part of Italian-American cuisine and is served in Italian restaurants all over America, where millions of dishes of it have been enjoyed by enthusiastic customers over the years. The recipe created by di Lelio is made with fresh fettucine egg noodles and the sauce is made by tossing butter and grated Parmigiano Reggiano together with the just cooked pasta. Italian restaurant owners in America make it a bit differently and their devoted customers just love it. In Italian restaurants in America the same fresh fettuccine egg pasta is used, but the sauce is different, it’s made of heavy-cream and the grated Parmigiano Reggiano instead of butter and Parmigiano, either way is equally tasty.

AMERICA’S GREATS OLD SCHOOL ITALIAN RESTAURANTS

Screen Shot 2017-06-29 at 2.46.09 PM

RAO’S

East Harlem , NEW YORK

Screen Shot 2017-07-02 at 2.04.44 PM.png

JOHN’S

EAST 12th STREET , NEW YORK NY

Original DECOR SINCE 1908

3f986-screen2bshot2b2013-10-122bat2b1-00-202bpm

GINO’S

Lexington Avenue , New York , NY

“Sadly, has closed, but it was one of America’s greatest Italian restaurants ever, so we just want to keeps its memory alive. Basta!”

 

FOR MORE GREAT ARTICLES of ITALIAN AMERICAN FOOD and CULTURE 

CLICK HERE !

FOR NewYork Italian

.